Is The Teas Test All About Multiple Choice?

I’ve given several different lectures on how to take the various multiple choice questions on the standard admissions tests and the results have always been very surprising to me. In fact, after I gave one of these lectures a few years ago, I was contacted by a number of students who had actually been unable to answer one of the multiple choice questions that day. Of course, not all students were unsuccessful but it certainly did add to my concern about the validity of the standardized tests.

Is The Teas Test All Multiple Choice? Using The Good Question? If you’ve taken any public education class, you’ve undoubtedly heard the instruction to “read, write and think.” It’s a good lesson in common sense, but why is this instruction always followed? I believe it comes down to two major factors, one being the desire to test our obedience and another being the need to see if we can learn anything from our teachers.

One thing that many teachers do is give students multiple choice questions that are heavily skewed in their favor. Even within the classroom, teachers will give students multiple choices that require them to think critically about what they are answering incorrectly. Of course, most students will do well on these tests and some will do exceptionally well. However, there are students who will struggle mightily on standardized tests because they are given multiple choice questions that don’t require them to think carefully about what they answer correctly.

Is The Teas Test All About reading Comprehension? In my experience, teachers focus far too much on the students’ reading comprehension skills when applying the standards for placement on the nursing school ladder. Certainly, reading comprehension is important, but I believe the real measure of a student’s intelligence is how much they can learn from a teacher. Therefore, I encourage parents to sit their children down and discuss their academic strengths and weaknesses with them so they can work on ways to strengthen their weaknesses and improve their reading comprehension.

Is The Teas Test All About Multiple Choice? While multiple choice is a requirement for entrance to many competitive colleges and universities, it should not be the only criteria for entrance. At the end of the day, I believe that students are best served by having a curriculum which allows for as many options as possible. Rather than spending so much time answering multiple choice questions about what kind of nursing assistant should look like, for example, I believe that they should be given the chance to learn about the different kinds of nurses and about the care they provide. Thus, by taking multiple choice tests, students will have a limited understanding of nursing and won’t have as much of a chance to develop critical thinking skills.

Is The Teas Test All About Math? Last week, I had an opportunity to speak with a parent of a recent graduate who had taken the MBBS from the University of Glasgow. She told me that her daughter’s MBBS had included an essay question which asked the students to identify whether a picture of a heart-shaped object like a hammer could be found in a number of places. The students had to explain how they knew that a heart was depicted in the image and answer the question.

Is The Teas Test All About Reading? In MBBS Multiple Choice, students are often encouraged to read a chapter a day and then answer a quiz to gauge their understanding. However, I think this approach misses the point. The real test is to see how well students understand the concepts presented and their interpretation of the content. How well they can apply these concepts to real life situations and examples is the measure of achievement and success.

Is The Teas Test All About Multiple Choice? Only in very few cases is the MBBS curriculum a truly multiple choice examination. Most MBBS tests are fairly simple in design and the multiple choice element of the test simply adds to the challenge. For students seeking high marks and success, I believe that a better test structure would allow for true multiple choice, planning and working skills development.